Waste It On Something Useful

“If the audience can accept it, that’s another thing. But, like, you see, if the audience doesn’t accept it, then it’ll be a long, long, long time before we can dream about that audience I thought was there.
I can become Orson Welles, poor bastard. Just been turned down by the studio that, like, I’m making this movie for, Universal International, half a million dollar picture, man, you know, for half a million dollars, and I mean, if they can’t build up Orson Welles making a movie for half a million dollars and show it in the universities, then fuck ‘m. And fuck the universities, fuck everybody, man.
Because, like, you know, then there’s no audience. There’s only a lot of frivolous, like, you know, cheerleaders, God bless you, everyone, cheerleaders, I love you, I love your image on television, I enjoy you almost as much as the football game, I wish you had a little more coverage…
However, you know, I mean, I really love pretty ladies and all that, but, man, hey, you know, I mean, if there isn’t an audience for Orson Welles and half a million dollars in the universities, and for the people in this country, you know, then, then, why we’re making movies?”

—   Dennis HOPPER in The American Dreamer (1971, L.M. Kit Carson & Lawrence Schiller)

Tonight William Friedkin is presenting 'Killer Joe',

his first film since the brilliant little Bug (2006) and his second collaboration with its writer Tracy Letts, at the 30th Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival!

“[solemnly] O-oh, this feels a little bit too close to home.”

—   Dieter Dengler having his hands tied, running through the jungle in a single file with Laotians, for a reenactment in Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, 1997)

"Life is full of beautiful things." Like this scene in This Must Be the Place (Paolo Sorrentino, 2011). The supporting actor in it is perfect, as well as the music, Trevor Green’s cover of ‘This Must Be the Place’ by The Talkings Heads.

A shame that the beginning of the bar sequence has been cut from this clip, ‘cause before the conversation there are some gorgeous shots of locals in it.

Years ago, when I caught this wonderful opening to Sorrentino’s Le conseguenze dell’amore (2004) on pay TV, I couldn’t look away. His work has always had this odd attracting quality to it.

Der Himmel über Berlin (Wings of Desire, Wim Wenders, 1987).
Written by Wim Wenders and Peter Handke.

CASSIEL (Otto Sander): Sunrise and 7:22 a.m. Sunset at 4:28 p.m. Moonrise at [….] Twenty years ago today a Soviet jet fighter crashed into the lake at Spandau. Fifty years ago there were the Olympic Games. Two-hundred years ago Blanchard flew over the city in a balloon.

DAMIEL (Bruno Ganz): Like the fugitives the other day.

CASSIEL: And today, on the Lilienthaler Chaussee, a man, walking, slowed down, and looked over his shoulder into space. At post office 44, a man who wants to end it all today pasted rare stamps on his farewell letters, a different one on each. He spoke English with an American soldier – the first time since his schooldays – and fluently. A prisoner at Plotzenzee, just before ramming his head against the wall, said: ‘Now!’ At the Zoo U-Bahn station, instead of the station’s name, the conductor suddenly shouted: ‘Tierra del Fuego!’

DAMIEL: Nice.

CASSIEL: In the hills, an old man read the Odyssey to a child. And the young listener stopped blinking his eyes…. And what do you have to tell?

DAMIEL: A woman on the street folded her umbrella while it rained and let herself get drenched. A schoolboy who described to his teacher how a fern grows out of the earth, and the astonished teacher. A blind woman who groped for her watch, feeling my presence…. It’s great to live only by the spirit, to testify day by day, for eternity, to the spiritual side of people. But sometimes I get fed up with my spiritual existence. Instead of forever hovering above I’d like to feel there’s some weight to me. To end my eternity, and bind me to earth. At each step, at each gust of wind, I’d like to be able to say: ‘Now! Now! and Now!’ And no longer say: ‘Since always’ and ‘Forever.’ To sit in the empty seat at a card table, and be greeted, if only by a nod…. Whenever we did participate, it was only a pretence. Wrestling with one of them, we allowed a hip to be dislocated, in pretence only. We pretended to catch a fish. We pretended to be seated at the tables. And to drink and eat…. Not that I want to plant a tree or give birth to a child right away. But it would be quite something to come home after a long day, like Philip Marlowe, and feed the cat. To have a fever. To have blackened fingers from the newspaper…. To feel your skeleton moving along as you walk. Finally to ‘suspect’, instead of forever knowing all. To be able to say ‘Ah!’ and ‘Oh!’ and ‘Hey!’ instead of ‘Yes’ and ‘Amen’.

CASSIEL: For once to be enthused over evil, to draw all of the demons of earth from passers-by and chase them out into the world. To be savage.

DAMIEL: Or to feel, at last what it’s like to take your shoes off under the table and to stretch your toes, barefoot, like that.

CASSIEL: To be alone. To let things happen. To remain serious. We can only be as savage as we are absolutely serious. To do more than observe, collect, testify, preserve. To remain a spirit. Keep your distance. Keep your word.

Poster for the ‘bad movie’ evening I held last week featuring The Garbage Pail Kids Movie, The Slumber Party Massacre and Death Stalker. It’s actually the fourth time I hosted an evening like that for some friends of mine.
The picture of the woman was taken from an eighties erotic magazine cover, which I found on Tumblr but - unfortunately - have lost.

Poster for the ‘bad movie’ evening I held last week featuring The Garbage Pail Kids Movie, The Slumber Party Massacre and Death Stalker. It’s actually the fourth time I hosted an evening like that for some friends of mine.

The picture of the woman was taken from an eighties erotic magazine cover, which I found on Tumblr but - unfortunately - have lost.

It had been a while since I experienced so much genuine fun and excitement watching a movie. The concept art and animation of Rango (Gore Verbinski, 2011) show such a rare richness. And this picture’s got brains too!
Two of my favorite character designs:




The villains are a also a treat. Though, to be fair, I found Bill Nighy’s accent impressive but his performance too ‘Davy Jones’.


One last confession: I chuckled at Ned Beatty’s mayor uttering the word “deliverance”.

It had been a while since I experienced so much genuine fun and excitement watching a movie. The concept art and animation of Rango (Gore Verbinski, 2011) show such a rare richness. And this picture’s got brains too!

Two of my favorite character designs:

The villains are a also a treat. Though, to be fair, I found Bill Nighy’s accent impressive but his performance too ‘Davy Jones’.

One last confession: I chuckled at Ned Beatty’s mayor uttering the word “deliverance”.

The Return (Vozvrashchenie, Andrei Zvyagintsev, 2003)

The Return (Vozvrashchenie, Andrei Zvyagintsev, 2003)

All off Zvyagintsev’s films have been lit and shot by Mikhail Krichman.

The Banishment, by the way, I was given on DVD a few years ago, as a present at the end of an internship. :)

The opening to The Banishment (Izgnanie, Andrej Zvyagintsev, 2007), carrying its haunting main music theme.